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Ethics and Governance

Ethical conduct of science, good governance of data, and accelerated translation to the clinic are key to high-calibre open neuroscience.  Everyday practitioners of science must be sensitized to a range of ethical considerations in their research, some having especially to do with open data-sharing. The lessons included in this course introduce a number of these topics and end with concrete guidance for participant consent and de-identification of data.

Course Features
Videos
Lectures
Tutorials
Lessons of this Course
1
1
Duration:
38:49

This lecture presents selected theories of ethics as applied to questions raised by the Human Brain Project.

2
1
Duration:
9:31

This lesson provides an overview of the ethical issues that have arisen as a result of the application of advancements in neurotechnology.

3
4
Duration:
50:15
Speaker:

In this lesson, attendees will learn about the challenges involved in working with life scientists to enhance their capacity for understanding, and taking responsibility for, the social implications of their research.

4
4
Duration:
55:19

This lecture covers how neuroscience could potentially influence the legal/justice system and the ethical implications therein.

5
5
Duration:
13:11

This lecture provides guidance on the ethical considerations the clinical neuroimaging community faces when applying the FAIR principles to their research. 

6
8
Duration:
55:13
Speaker:

This lecture discusses how artificial intelligence (AI) is presented in policy documents as a disruptive and transformative technology. The talk will further elaborate on how policy-makers frame social risks and opportunities associated with AI in areas such as employment, business, healthcare, education, and military.

7
12
Duration:
41:06

This talk discusses the potential contribution of philosophical reflection on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), referring to specific works done within SP12.

8
17

In response to a growing need in the neuroscience community for concrete guidance concerning ethically sound and pragmatically feasible open data-sharing, the CONP has created an ‘Ethics Toolkit’. These documents (links found below in 'Documents' section) are meant to help researchers identify key elements in the design and conduct of their projects that are often required for the open sharing of neuroscience data, such as model consent language and approaches to de-identification.

This guidance is the product of extended discussions and careful drafting by the CONP Ethics and Governance Committee that considers both Canadian and international ethical frameworks and research practice. The best way to cite these resources is with their associated Zenodo DOI:

zenodo.5655350

9
20

Open Brain Consent is an international initiative aiming to address the challenge of creating participant consent language that will promote the open sharing of data, protect participant privacy, and conform to legal norms and institutional review boards.

Open Brain Consent addresses the aforementioned difficulties in neuroscience research with human participants by collecting:

  • widely acceptable consent forms (with various translations) allowing deposition of anonymized data to public data archives
  • collection of tools/pipelines to help anonymization of neuroimaging data making it ready for sharing