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EEGLAB is an interactive Matlab toolbox for processing continuous and event-related EEG, MEG and other electrophysiological data incorporating independent component analysis (ICA), time/frequency analysis, artifact rejection, event-related statistics, and several useful modes of visualization of the averaged and single-trial data. EEGLAB runs under Linux, Unix, Windows, and Mac OS X.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 15:32
Speaker: : Arnaud Delorme
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 9:20
Speaker: :
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 8:30
Speaker: : Arnaud Delorme
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:01
Speaker: : Arnaud Delorme

This module covers many of the types of non-invasive neurotech and neuroimaging devices including Electroencephalography (EEG), Electromyography (EMG), Electroneurography (ENG), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNRIs), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and Computed Tomography

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:36
Speaker: : Harrison Canning
Course:

An introduction to data management, manipulation, visualization, and analysis for neuroscience. Students will learn scientific programming in Python, and use this to work with example data from areas such as cognitive-behavioral research, single-cell recording, EEG, and structural and functional MRI. Basic signal processing techniques including filtering are covered. The course includes a Jupyter Notebook and video tutorials.

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:09:16
Speaker: : Aaron J. Newman

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks. The lecture and tutorial were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

Lecture on functional brain parcellations and a set of tutorials on bootstrap agregation of stable clusters (BASC) for fMRI brain parcellation which were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Pierre Bellec

This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:25:05
Speaker: : Satrajit Ghosh

This lecture introduces you to the basics of the Amazon Web Services public cloud. It covers the fundamentals of cloud computing and go through both motivation and process involved in moving your research computing to the cloud. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:09:12
Speaker: : Amanda Tan
Course:

BioImage Suite is an integrated image analysis software suite developed at Yale University. BioImage Suite has been extensively used at different labs at Yale since about 2001.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 01:47
Speaker: : BioImage Suite
Course:

Fibr is an app for quality control of diffusion MRI images from the Healthy Brain Network, a landmark mental health study that is collecting MRI images and other assessment data from 10,000 New York City area children. The purpose of the app is to train a computer algorithm to analyze the Healthy Brain Network dataset. By playing fibr, you are helping to teach the computer which images have sufficiently good quality and which images do not. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 02:26
Speaker: : Ariel Rokem
Course:

This Jupyter Book is a series of interactive tutorials about quantitative T1 mapping, powered by qMRLab. Most figures are generated with Plot.ly – you can play with them by hovering your mouse over the data, zooming in (click and drag) and out (double click), moving the sliders, and changing the drop-down options. To view the code that was used to generate the figures in this blog post, hover your cursor in the top left corner of the frame that contains the tutorial and click the checkbox “All cells” in the popup that appears.

Jupyter Lab notebooks of these tutorials are also available through MyBinder, and inline code modification inside the Jupyter Book is provided by Thebelab. For both options, you can modify the code, change the figures, and regenerate the html that was used to create the tutorial below. This Jupyter Book also uses a Script of Scripts (SoS) kernel, allowing us to process the data using qMRLab in MATLAB/Octave and plot the figures with Plot.ly using Python, all within the same Jupyter Notebook.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration:
Speaker: :