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Brief introduction to Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs), persistent and unique identifiers for referencing a research resource. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:30
Speaker: : Anita Bandrowski

Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) are ID numbers assigned to help researchers cite key resources (antibodies, model organisms and software projects) in the biomedical literature to improve transparency of research methods.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:01:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone
Course:

The Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) is a standard prescribing a formal way to name and organize MRI data and metadata in a file system that simplifies communication and collaboration between users and enables easier data validation and software development through using consistent paths and naming for data files.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 0:56
Course:

Neurodata Without Borders (NWB) is a data standard for neurophysiology that provides neuroscientists with a common standard to share, archive, use, and build common analysis tools for neurophysiology data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:11
Speaker: : Ben Dichter
Course:

The Neuroimaging Data Model (NIDM) is a collection of specification documents that define extensions the W3C PROV standard for the domain of human brain mapping. NIDM uses provenance information as means to link components from different stages of the scientific research process from dataset descriptors and computational workflow, to derived data and publication.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 0:53

Neuroscience Information Exchange (NIX) Format data model allows storing fully annotated scientific datasets, i.e. the data together with rich metadata and their relations in a consistent, comprehensive format. Its aim is to achieve standardization by providing a common data structure and APIs for a multitude of data types and use cases, focused on but not limited to neuroscience. In contrast to most other approaches, the NIX approach is to achieve this flexibility with a minimum set of data model elements.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:03
Speaker: : Thomas Wachtler

Computational models provide a framework for integrating data across spatial scales and for exploring hypotheses about the biological mechanisms underlying neuronal and network dynamics. However, as models increase in complexity, additional barriers emerge to the creation, exchange, and re-use of models. Successful projects have created standards for describing complex models in neuroscience and provide open source tools to address these issues. This lecture provides an overview of these projects and make a case for expanded use of resources in support of reproducibility and validation of models against experimental data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:39
Speaker: : Sharon Crook

Introduction to the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS): a standard for organizing human neuroimaging datasets. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 56:49

NWB: An ecosystem for neurophysiology data standardization

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 29:53
Speaker: : Oliver Ruebel

NWB: An ecosystem for neurophysiology data standardization

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 29:53
Speaker: : Oliver Ruebel

DAQCORD is a framework for the design, documentation and reporting of data curation methods in order to advance the scientific rigour, reproducibility and analysis of the data. This lecture covers the rationale for developing the framework, the process in which the framework was developed, and ends with a presentation of the framework. While the driving use case for DAQCORD was clinical traumatic brain injury research, the framework is applicable to clinical studies in other domains of clinical neuroscience research.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 17:08
Speaker: : Ari Ercole

PyNN is a simulator-independent language for building neuronal network models. The PyNN API aims to support modelling at a high-level of abstraction (populations of neurons, layers, columns and the connections between them) while still allowing access to the details of individual neurons and synapses when required. PyNN provides a library of standard neuron, synapse, and synaptic plasticity models which have been verified to work the same on the different supported simulators. PyNN also provides a set of commonly-used connectivity algorithms (e.g. all-to-all, random, distance-dependent, small-world) but makes it easy to provide your own connectivity in a simulator-independent way. This lecture was part of the 7th SpiNNaker Workshop held 3 - 6 October 2017.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 25:49

Lecture on the most important concepts in software engineering

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 32:59
Speaker: : Jeff Muller

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks. The lecture and tutorial were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

Lecture on functional brain parcellations and a set of tutorials on bootstrap agregation of stable clusters (BASC) for fMRI brain parcellation which were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Pierre Bellec

This lecture introduces you to the basics of the Amazon Web Services public cloud. It covers the fundamentals of cloud computing and go through both motivation and process involved in moving your research computing to the cloud. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:09:12
Speaker: : Amanda Tan

As models in neuroscience have become increasingly complex, it has become more difficult to share all aspects of models and model analysis, hindering model accessibility and reproducibility. In this session, we will discuss existing resources for promoting FAIR data and models in computational neuroscience, their impact on the field, and the remaining barriers. This lecture covers how FAIR practices affect personalized data models, including workflows, challenges, and how to improve these practices.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:16
Speaker: : Kelly Shen

Much like neuroinformatics, data science uses techniques from computational science to derive meaningful results from large complex datasets. In this session, we will explore the relationship between neuroinformatics and data science, by emphasizing a range of data science approaches and activities, ranging from the development and application of statistical methods, through the establishment of communities and platforms, and through the implementation of open-source software tools. Rather than rigid distinctions, in the data science of neuroinformatics, these activities and approaches intersect and interact in dynamic ways. Together with a panel of cutting-edge neuro-data-scientist speakers, we will explore these dynamics

 

This lecture covers how brainlife.io works, and how it can be applied to neuroscience data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 10:14
Speaker: : Franco Pestilli

As a part of NeuroHackademy 2020, Tara Madhyastha (University of Washington), Andrew Crabb (AWS), and Ariel Rokem (University of Washington) give a lecture on Cloud Computing, focusing on Amazon Web Services

 

This video is provided by the University of Washington eScience Institute.

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 01:43:59
Speaker: :

Shawn Brown presents an overview of CBRAIN, a web-based platform that allows neuroscientists to perform computationally intensive data analyses by connecting them to high-performance-computing facilities across Canada and around the world.

 

This talk was given in the context of a Ludmer Centre event in 2019.

 

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 56:07
Speaker: :