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Lecture title:

The probability of a hypothesis, given data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 7:57
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Why math is useful in data science.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:35
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Why statistics are useful for data science.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 4:01
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Statistics is exploring data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:23
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Graphical data exploration

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 8:01
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Numerical data exploration

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:05
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Simple description of statistical data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 10:16
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Basics of hypothesis testing.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 06:04
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

In this lecture, the speaker demonstrates Neurokernel's module interfacing feature by using it to integrate independently developed models of olfactory and vision LPUs based upon experimentally obtained connectivity information.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 29:56
Speaker: : Aurel A. Lazar
Lecture title:

2nd part of the lecture. Introduction to cell receptors and signalling cascades

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 41:38
Lecture title:

GABAergic interneurons and local inhibition on the circuit level.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 16:27
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
Lecture title:

How does the brain learn? This lecture discusses the roles of development and adult plasticity in shaping functional connectivity.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:08:45
Speaker: : Clay Reid
Lecture title:

JupyterHub is a simple, highly extensible, multi-user system for managing per-user Jupyter Notebook servers, designed for research groups or classes. This lecture covers deploying JupyterHub on a single server, as well as deploying with Docker using GitHub for authentication.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:36:27
Speaker: : Thomas Kluyver.
Lecture title:

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49
Lecture title:

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl
Lecture title:

Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield
Lecture title:

In the face of perceived public concerns about technological innovations, leading national and international bodies increasingly argue that there must be ‘dialogue' between policy makers, scientific researchers, civil society organizations and members of the public, to shape the pathways of technology development in a way that meets societal needs and gains public trust. This is not new, of course, and such concerns go back at least to the debates over the development of nuclear technologies and campaigns for social responsibility in science. Major funding bodies in the UK, Europe and elsewhere are now addressing this issue by insisting on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) in the development of emerging technology. Biotechnologies such as synthetic biology and neurotechnologies have become a particular focus of RRI, partly because of the belief that these are risky technologies involving tinkering with the very building blocks of life, and perhaps even with human nature. With my fellow researchers, I have been involved in trying to develop Responsible Research and Innovation in these technologies for several years.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 50:15
Speaker: : Nikolas Rose
Lecture title:

In this lecture, I consider some of the key social and ethical issues raised by the ‘big brain projects’ currently under way in Europe, the USA, China, Japan and many other regions. I will draw upon our own experience in the ‘ Foresight Lab’ of the HBP to discuss the ways in which these can usefully be approached from the perspective of responsible research and innovation and the AREA approach - anticipation, reflection, engagement and action. These include data protection, privacy and data governance; the search for ‘neural signatures’ of psychaitric and neurological disorders; ‘dual use’ or the military use of developments initially intended for clinical and civilian purposes; brain-computer interfaces and neural prosthetics; and the use of animals in brain research. Following a brief discussion of the challenges of translation from the lab to the real world, I will conclude by arguing that success in contemporary scientific research and innovation is best assured by openness, collaboration, sharing with fellow researchers; robust systems of data governance involving lay persons; frankness about realities of scientific research and innovation with fellow citizens; realism about complexities of links between researchers, publics and private enterprise; and understanding and engaging with the realities of science today in the real world.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 53:08
Speaker: : Nikolas Rose
Lecture title:

The UK Royal Society in its 2012 study of Neuroscience, conflict and security had as its first recommendation that: “There needs to be fresh effort by the appropriate professional bodies to inculcate the awareness of the dual-use challenge (i.e., knowledge and technologies used for beneficial purposes can also be misused for harmful purposes) among neuroscientists at an early stage of their training.” There can be little doubt that the need to raise awareness of this challenge remains among practicing neuroscientists today. This lecture aims to give an introduction and overview of the dual-use challenge as it applies to neuroscience today and will apply in coming decades.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:11
Speaker: : Malcolm Dando
Lecture title:

What is Ethics in biomedical research? In this case the ethics we talk about is how we think we can use animals in biomedical research and what we gain from the experimental setup of experiments. We will talk about “a common set of values” and how 3R engagement can make a difference to experimental procedures and a progress in the positive outcome of experimental procedures and results and scientific papers of the future.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 51:04