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The Virtual Brain is an open-source, multi-scale, multi-modal brain simulation platform. In this lesson, you get introduced to brain simulation in general and to The Virtual brain in particular. Prof. Ritter will present the newest approaches for clinical applications of The Virtual brain - that is, for stroke, epilepsy, brain tumors and Alzheimer’s disease - and show how brain simulation can improve diagnostics, therapy and understanding of neurological disease.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:35:08
Speaker: : Petra Ritter

The concept of neural masses, an application of mean field theory, is introduced as a possible surrogate for electrophysiological signals in brain simulation. The mathematics of neural mass models and their integration to a coupled network are explained. Bifurcation analysis is presented as an important technique in the understanding of non-linear systems and as a fundamental method in the design of brain simulations. Finally, the application of the described mathematics is demonstrated in the exploration of brain stimulation regimes.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:49:24
Speaker: : Andreas Spiegler

The simulation of the virtual epileptic patient is presented as an example of advanced brain simulation as a translational approach to deliver improved results in clinics. The fundamentals of epilepsy are explained. On this basis, the concept of epilepsy simulation is developed. By using an iPython notebook, the detailed process of this approach is explained step by step. In the end, you are able to perform simple epilepsy simulations your own.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:28:53
Speaker: : Julie Courtiol

A brief overview of the Python programming language, with an emphasis on tools relevant to data scientists. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:16:36
Speaker: : Tal Yarkoni

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks. The lecture and tutorial were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

Lecture on functional brain parcellations and a set of tutorials on bootstrap agregation of stable clusters (BASC) for fMRI brain parcellation which were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Pierre Bellec

In this presentation by the OHBM OpenScienceSIG, Tom Shaw and Steffen Bollmann cover how containers can be useful for running the same software on different platforms and sharing analysis pipelines with other researchers. They demonstrate how to build docker containers from scratch, using Neurodocker, and cover how to use containers on an HPC with singularity.

 

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 01:21:59

This lecture provides an overview of depression (epidemiology and course of the disorder), clinical presentation, somatic co-morbidity, and treatment options.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 37:51

This module explains how neurons come together to create the networks that give rise to our thoughts. The totality of our neurons and their connection is called our connectome. Learn how this connectome changes as we learn, and computes information. We will also learn about physiological phenomena of the brain such as synchronicity that gives rise to brain waves.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 7:13
Speaker: : Harrison Canning

Introduction to the FAIR Principles and examples of applications of the FAIR Principles in neuroscience. This lecture was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:57

Next generation science with Jupyter. This lecture was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

Introduction to reproducible research. The lecture provides an overview of the core skills and practical solutions required to practice reproducible research. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:25:17
Speaker: : Fernando Perez

Computational models provide a framework for integrating data across spatial scales and for exploring hypotheses about the biological mechanisms underlying neuronal and network dynamics. However, as models increase in complexity, additional barriers emerge to the creation, exchange, and re-use of models. Successful projects have created standards for describing complex models in neuroscience and provide open source tools to address these issues. This lecture provides an overview of these projects and make a case for expanded use of resources in support of reproducibility and validation of models against experimental data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:39
Speaker: : Sharon Crook

Brought to you by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries.

 

Keeping data and research materials organized across all phases of the research process is always a challenging process. To help the research community address these challenges, the Center for Open Science developed the Open Science Framework (OSF), a research tool that supports collaboration, data management, and transparency throughout the research lifecycle. The OSF provides avenues for researchers to design a study; collect, analyze, and store data; manage collaborators; and publish research materials. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the many features of the OSF and develop strategies for using the tool within the context of their own research projects. The discussion will be framed around how to best utilize the OSF while also implementing data management and open science best practices.

 

Speakers Kevin Read, MLIS, MAS is a health sciences librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. He has been providing data services in health sciences libraries for the past 8 years in both Canada and the U.S. He is the current Chair of the Portage Network’s Data Discovery Expert Group, and is in the process of conducting research on how Canadian-funded researchers describe and share their data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: :

The FOSTER portal has produced a number of guides to help implement Open Science practices in daily workflows, including The Open Science Training Handbook.  It provides many basic definitions, concepts, and principles that are key components of open science, as well as general guidance for developing and implementing these practices in one's own research environments.

 

Topics include:

  • Open Concepts and Principles
  • Open Research Data and Materials
  • Open Research Software and Open Source
  • Reproducible Research and Data Analysis
  • Open Access to Published Research Results
  • Open Licensing and File Formats
  • Collaborative Platforms
  • Open Peer Review, Metrics and Evaluation
  • Open Science Policies
  • Citizen Science
  • Open Educational Resources
  • Open Advocacy
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
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