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This is an in-depth guide on EEG signals and their interaction within brain microcircuits. Participants are also shown techniques and software for simulating, analyzing, and visualizing these signals.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:30:41
Speaker: : Frank Mazza

In this tutorial on simulating whole-brain activity using Python, participants can follow along using corresponding code and repositories, learning the basics of neural oscillatory dynamics, evoked responses and EEG signals, ultimately leading to the design of a network model of whole-brain anatomical connectivity. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:16:10
Speaker: : John Griffiths

This lecture goes into detailed description of how to process workflows in the virtual research environment (VRE), including approaches for standardization, metadata, containerization, and constructing and maintaining scientific pipelines. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:03:55
Speaker: : Patrik Bey

This lesson is the first of three hands-on tutorials as part of the workshop Research Workflows for Collaborative Neuroscience. This tutorial goes over how to visualize data with Scanpy, a scalable toolkit for analyzing single-cell gene expression. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 25:26

In this third and final hands-on tutorial from the Research Workflows for Collaborative Neuroscience workshop, you will learn about workflow orchestration using open source tools like DataJoint and Flyte. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:36
Speaker: : Daniel Xenes

This lecture describes how to build research workflows, including a demonstrate using DataJoint Elements to build data pipelines.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 47:00
Speaker: : Dimitri Yatsenko

Explore how to setup an epileptic seizure simulation with the TVB graphical user interface. This lesson will show you how to program the epileptor model in the brain network to simulate a epileptic seizure originating in the hippocampus. It will also show how to upload and view mouse connectivity data, as well as give a short introduction to the python script interface of TVB.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 58:06
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn

This tutorial covers the fundamentals of collaborating with Git and GitHub.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks, as well as how to account for inherent variability within those networks. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

In this lesson, you will learn about the Python project Nipype, an open-source, community-developed initiative under the umbrella of NiPy. Nipype provides a uniform interface to existing neuroimaging software and facilitates interaction between these packages within a single workflow.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:25:05
Speaker: : Satrajit Ghosh

This lecture introduces you to the basics of the Amazon Web Services public cloud. It covers the fundamentals of cloud computing and goes through both the motivations and processes involved in moving your research computing to the cloud.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:09:12

This lecture gives an overview of how to prepare and preprocess neuroimaging (EEG/MEG) data for use in TVB.  

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:40:52
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn

This lecture covers the rationale for developing the DAQCORD, a framework for the design, documentation, and reporting of data curation methods in order to advance the scientific rigour, reproducibility, and analysis of data.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 17:08
Speaker: : Ari Ercole
Course:

This Jupyter Book is a series of interactive tutorials about quantitative T1 mapping, powered by qMRLab. Most figures are generated with Plot.ly – you can play with them by hovering your mouse over the data, zooming in (click and drag) and out (double click), moving the sliders, and changing the drop-down options. To view the code that was used to generate the figures in this blog post, hover your cursor in the top left corner of the frame that contains the tutorial and click the checkbox “All cells” in the popup that appears.

Jupyter Lab notebooks of these tutorials are also available through MyBinder, and inline code modification inside the Jupyter Book is provided by Thebelab. For both options, you can modify the code, change the figures, and regenerate the html that was used to create the tutorial below. This Jupyter Book also uses a Script of Scripts (SoS) kernel, allowing us to process the data using qMRLab in MATLAB/Octave and plot the figures with Plot.ly using Python, all within the same Jupyter Notebook.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration:
Speaker: :