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This lesson is a general overview of overarching concepts in neuroinformatics research, with a particular focus on clinical approaches to defining, measuring, studying, diagnosing, and treating various brain disorders. Also described are the complex, multi-level nature of brain disorders and the data associated with them, from genes and individual cells up to cortical microcircuits and whole-brain network dynamics. Given the heterogeneity of brain disorders and their underlying mechanisms, this lesson lays out a case for multiscale neuroscience data integration.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:09:33
Speaker: : Sean Hill

This is a hands-on tutorial on PLINK, the open source whole genome association analysis toolset. The aims of this tutorial are to teach users how to perform basic quality control on genetic datasets, as well as to identify and understand GWAS summary statistics. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:27:18
Speaker: : Dan Felsky

This lesson is an overview of transcriptomics, from fundamental concepts of the central dogma and RNA sequencing at the single-cell level, to how genetic expression underlies diversity in cell phenotypes. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:29:08

This is an introductory lecture on whole-brain modelling, delving into the various spatial scales of neuroscience, neural population models, and whole-brain modelling. Additionally, the clinical applications of building and testing such models are characterized. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:24:44
Speaker: : John Griffiths

In this tutorial on simulating whole-brain activity using Python, participants can follow along using corresponding code and repositories, learning the basics of neural oscillatory dynamics, evoked responses and EEG signals, ultimately leading to the design of a network model of whole-brain anatomical connectivity. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:16:10
Speaker: : John Griffiths

This lesson breaks down the principles of Bayesian inference and how it relates to cognitive processes and functions like learning and perception. It is then explained how cognitive models can be built using Bayesian statistics in order to investigate how our brains interface with their environment. 

This lesson corresponds to slides 1-64 in the PDF below. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:28:14

In this third and final hands-on tutorial from the Research Workflows for Collaborative Neuroscience workshop, you will learn about workflow orchestration using open source tools like DataJoint and Flyte. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:36
Speaker: : Daniel Xenes

This lecture describes how to build research workflows, including a demonstrate using DataJoint Elements to build data pipelines.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 47:00
Speaker: : Dimitri Yatsenko

This video will document the process of creating a pipeline rule for batch processing on brainlife.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 0:57
Speaker: :

This lesson briefly goes over the outline of the Neuroscience for Machine Learners course. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:05
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This lesson goes over the basic mechanisms of neural synapses, the space between neurons where signals may be transmitted. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 7:03
Speaker: : Marcus Ghosh

Whereas the previous two lessons described the biophysical and signalling properties of individual neurons, this lesson describes properties of those units when part of larger networks. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 6:00
Speaker: : Marcus Ghosh

This lesson goes over some examples of how machine learners and computational neuroscientists go about designing and building neural network models inspired by biological brain systems. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:52
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This lesson describes spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a biological process that adjusts the strength of connections between neurons in the brain, and how one can implement or mimic this process in a computational model. You will also find links for practical exercises at the bottom of this page. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:50
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This lesson discusses a gripping neuroscientific question: why have neurons developed the discrete action potential, or spike, as a principle method of communication? 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 9:34
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

In this lecture, the speaker demonstrates Neurokernel's module interfacing feature by using it to integrate independently developed models of olfactory and vision LPUs based upon experimentally obtained connectivity information.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 29:56
Speaker: : Aurel A. Lazar

This lecture highlights the importance of correct annotation and assignment of location, and updated atlas resources to avoid errors in navigation and data interpretation.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:04
Speaker: : Trygve Leergard

We are at the exciting technological stage where it has become feasible to represent the anatomy of an entire human brain at the cellular level. This lecture discusses how neuroanatomy in the 21st Century has become an effort towards the virtualization and standardization of brain tissue.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 25:27
Speaker: : Jacopo Annese

This lecture covers essential features of digital brain models for neuroinformatics, particularly NeuroMaps. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:26
Speaker: : Douglas Bowden

This presentation covers the neuroinformatics tools and techniques used and their relationship to neuroanatomy for the Allen Institute's atlases of the mouse, developing mouse, and mouse connectional atlas.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 23:41
Speaker: : Mike Hawrylycz