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Lecture title:

This lecture covers an introduction to neuroinformatics and its subfields, the content of the short course and future neuroinformatics applications.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 34:27
Lecture title:

Introduction to the Mathematics chapter of Datalabcc's "Foundations in Data Science" series.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:53
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on elementary algebra

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 3:03
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on linear algebra

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:38
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on systems of linear equations

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:24
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Primer on calculus

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 4:17
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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How calculus relates to optimization

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 8:43
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Big O notation

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:19
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

Basics of probability.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 7:33
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
Lecture title:

The "connectome" is a term, coined in the past decade, that has been used to describe more than one phenomenon in neuroscience. This lecture explains the basics of structural connections at the micro-, meso- and macroscopic scales.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:13:16
Speaker: : Clay Reid
Lecture title:

Introduction to the course Cellular Mechanisms of Brain Function.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 12:20
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
Lecture title:

Introduction to the course Cellular Mechanisms of Brain Function.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 12:20
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
Lecture title:

Ion channels and the movement of ions across the cell membrane.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 25:51
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
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Action potential initiation and propagation.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 09:13
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
Lecture title:

Synaptic transmission and neurotransmitters

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 28:22
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
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Neurodata Without Borders (NWB) is a data standard for neurophysiology that provides neuroscientists with a common standard to share, archive, use, and build common analysis tools for neurophysiology data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:11
Speaker: : Ben Dichter
Lecture title:

Neuroscience Information Exchange (NIX) Format data model allows storing fully annotated scientific datasets, i.e. the data together with rich metadata and their relations in a consistent, comprehensive format. Its aim is to achieve standardization by providing a common data structure and APIs for a multitude of data types and use cases, focused on but not limited to neuroscience. In contrast to most other approaches, the NIX approach is to achieve this flexibility with a minimum set of data model elements.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:03
Speaker: : Thomas Wachtler
Lecture title:

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49
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The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl
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Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield