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The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) provides access to primary experimental trait data, genotypic variation, protocols and analysis tools for mouse genetic studies. Data are contributed by investigators worldwide and represent a broad scope of phenotyping endpoints and disease-related traits in naïve mice and those exposed to drugs, environmental agents or other treatments. MPD ensures rigorous curation of phenotype data and supporting documentation using relevant ontologies and controlled vocabularies. As a repository of curated and integrated data, MPD provides a means to access/re-use baseline data, as well as allows users to identify sensitized backgrounds for making new mouse models with genome editing technologies, analyze trait co-inheritance, benchmark assays in their own laboratories, and many other research applications. MPD’s primary source of funding is NIDA. For this reason, a majority of MPD data is neuro- and behavior-related.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:36
Speaker: : Elissa Chesler
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Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 43:38
Speaker: : Kent Lloyd
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Lecture on the most important concepts in software engineering

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 32:59
Speaker: : Jeff Muller
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This lecture covers modeling the neuron in silicon, modeling vision and audition and sensory fusion using a deep network. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:32:17
Speaker: : Shih-Chii Liu
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Presentation of a simulation software for spatial model neurons and their networks designed primarily for GPUs.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 21:15
Speaker: : Tadashi Yamazaki
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Presentation of past and present neurocomputing approaches and hybrid analog/digital circuits that directly emulate the properties of neurons and synapses.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 41:57
Speaker: : Giacomo Indiveri
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Presentation of the Brian neural simulator, where models are defined directly by their mathematical equations and code is automatically generated for each specific target.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 20:39
Speaker: : Giacomo Indiveri
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Introduction to the Mathematics chapter of Datalabcc's "Foundations in Data Science" series.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:53
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on elementary algebra

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 3:03
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on linear algebra

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:38
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on systems of linear equations

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:24
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Primer on calculus

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 4:17
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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How calculus relates to optimization

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 8:43
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Big O notation

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:19
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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Basics of probability.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 7:33
Speaker: : Barton Poulson
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The "connectome" is a term, coined in the past decade, that has been used to describe more than one phenomenon in neuroscience. This lecture explains the basics of structural connections at the micro-, meso- and macroscopic scales.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:13:16
Speaker: : Clay Reid
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How does the brain learn? This lecture discusses the roles of development and adult plasticity in shaping functional connectivity.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:08:45
Speaker: : Clay Reid
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An overview of some of the essential concepts in neuropharmacology (e.g. receptor binding, agonism, antagonism), an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and an overview of the drug discovery process relative to diseases of the Central Nervous System.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 45:47
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Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49
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The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl