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Lecture title:

This lecture will discuss how understanding and applying simple neuroanatomical rules, one can localize the damage along the neuroaxis, the first crucial step toward making the correct clinical diagnosis and initiating treatment.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 44:52
Speaker: : Eitan Auriel
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Introduction to the principal of anatomical organization of neural systems in the human brain and spinal cord that mediate sensation, integrate signals, and motivate behavior.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 59:57
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This lecture focuses on the comprehension of nociception and pain sensation. It highlights how the somatosensory system and different molecular partners are involved in nociception and how nociception and pain sensation are studied in rodents and humans and the development of pain therapy.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 28:09
Speaker: : Serena Quarta
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From the retina to the superior colliculus, the lateral geniculate nucleus into primary visual cortex and beyond, this lecture gives a tour of the mammalian visual system highlighting the Nobel-prize winning discoveries of Hubel & Wiesel.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 56:31
Speaker: : Clay Reid
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From Universal Turing Machines to McCulloch-Pitts and Hopfield associative memory networks, this lecture explains what is meant by computation.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:27
Speaker: : Christof Koch
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In an overview of the structure of the mammalian neocortex, this lecture explains how the mammalian cortex is organized in a hierarchy, describing the columnar principle and canonical microcircuits

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:02:02
Speaker: : Clay Reid
Lecture title:

The retina has 60 different types of neurons. What are their functions? This lecture explores the definition of cell types and their functions in the mammalian retina.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:07:19
Speaker: : Christof Koch
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Optical imaging offers a look inside the working brain. This lecture takes a look at orientation and ocular dominance columns in the visual cortex, and shows how they can be viewed with calcium imaging.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 26:17
Speaker: : Clay Reid
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Ion channels and the movement of ions across the cell membrane.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 25:51
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
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Investigating the structure of synapses with electron microscopy.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 28:23
Speaker: : Carl Petersen
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Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:40
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:35
Speaker: : Unknown
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Tutorial describing the basic features of the Brain Explorer® 3-D viewer for the mouse brain

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:41
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

This tutorial demonstrates how to use the differential search feature of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas to find gene markers for different regions of the brain and to visualize this gene expression in three-dimensional space. Differential search is also available for the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas and the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:31
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

The chair of the workshop is giving an introduction and a motivating argument.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone
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JupyterHub is a simple, highly extensible, multi-user system for managing per-user Jupyter Notebook servers, designed for research groups or classes. This lecture covers deploying JupyterHub on a single server, as well as deploying with Docker using GitHub for authentication.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:36:27
Speaker: : Thomas Kluyver.
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Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49
Lecture title:

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl
Lecture title:

Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield
Lecture title:

In the face of perceived public concerns about technological innovations, leading national and international bodies increasingly argue that there must be ‘dialogue' between policy makers, scientific researchers, civil society organizations and members of the public, to shape the pathways of technology development in a way that meets societal needs and gains public trust. This is not new, of course, and such concerns go back at least to the debates over the development of nuclear technologies and campaigns for social responsibility in science. Major funding bodies in the UK, Europe and elsewhere are now addressing this issue by insisting on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) in the development of emerging technology. Biotechnologies such as synthetic biology and neurotechnologies have become a particular focus of RRI, partly because of the belief that these are risky technologies involving tinkering with the very building blocks of life, and perhaps even with human nature. With my fellow researchers, I have been involved in trying to develop Responsible Research and Innovation in these technologies for several years.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 50:15
Speaker: : Nikolas Rose