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FAIR principles and methods currently in development for assessing FAIRness.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: : Michel Dumontier

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:40
Speaker: : Unknown

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:35
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial demonstrates how to use the differential search feature of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas to find gene markers for different regions of the brain and to visualize this gene expression in three-dimensional space. Differential search is also available for the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas and the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:31
Speaker: : Unknown
Course:

The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) provides access to primary experimental trait data, genotypic variation, protocols and analysis tools for mouse genetic studies. Data are contributed by investigators worldwide and represent a broad scope of phenotyping endpoints and disease-related traits in naïve mice and those exposed to drugs, environmental agents or other treatments. MPD ensures rigorous curation of phenotype data and supporting documentation using relevant ontologies and controlled vocabularies. As a repository of curated and integrated data, MPD provides a means to access/re-use baseline data, as well as allows users to identify sensitized backgrounds for making new mouse models with genome editing technologies, analyze trait co-inheritance, benchmark assays in their own laboratories, and many other research applications. MPD’s primary source of funding is NIDA. For this reason, a majority of MPD data is neuro- and behavior-related.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:36
Speaker: : Elissa Chesler

GeneWeaver is a web application for the integrated cross-species analysis of functional genomics data to find convergent evidence from heterogeneous sources. The application consists of a large database of gene sets curated from multiple public data resources and curated submissions, along with a suite of analysis tools designed to allow flexible, customized workflows through web-based interactive analysis or scripted API driven analysis. Gene sets come from multiple widely studied species and include ontology annotations, brain gene expression atlases, systems genetic study results, gene regulatory information, pathway databases, drug interaction databases and many other sources. Users can retrieve, store, analyze and share gene sets through a graded access system. Analysis tools are based on combinatorics and statistical methods for comparing, contrasting and classifying gene sets based on their members.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 25:53
Speaker: :

Introductory presentation on how data science can help with scientific reproducibility.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: : Michel Dumontier

Introduction to the types of glial cells, homeostasis (influence of cerebral blood flow and influence on neurons), insulation and protection of axons (myelin sheath; nodes of Ranvier), microglia and reactions of the CNS to injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:32

Introduction to the principal of anatomical organization of neural systems in the human brain and spinal cord that mediate sensation, integrate signals, and motivate behavior.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 59:57

This lecture focuses on the comprehension of nociception and pain sensation. It highlights how the somatosensory system and different molecular partners are involved in nociception and how nociception and pain sensation are studied in rodents and humans and the development of pain therapy.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 28:09
Speaker: : Serena Quarta

Tutorial describing the basic features of the Brain Explorer® 3-D viewer for the mouse brain

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:41
Speaker: : Unknown

This lecture focuses on how the immune system can target and attack the nervous system to produce autoimmune responses that may result in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis and lupus cerebritis manifested by motor, sensory, and cognitive impairments. Despite the fact that the brain is an immune-privileged site, autoreactive lymphocytes producing proinflammatory cytokines can cause active brain inflammation, leading to myelin and axonal loss.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 37:36
Speaker: : Anat Achiron

This tutorial talks about how to upload and version your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:36
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to share your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:22
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to run analysis in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:26
Speaker: : Unknown

The landscape of scientific research is changing. Today’s researchers need to participate in large-scale collaborations, obtain and manage funding, share data, publish, and undertake knowledge translation activities in order to be successful. As per these increasing demands, Science Management is now a vital piece of the environment.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 18:13
Speaker: : Mojib Javadi

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl

Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield

In the face of perceived public concerns about technological innovations, leading national and international bodies increasingly argue that there must be ‘dialogue' between policy makers, scientific researchers, civil society organizations and members of the public, to shape the pathways of technology development in a way that meets societal needs and gains public trust. This is not new, of course, and such concerns go back at least to the debates over the development of nuclear technologies and campaigns for social responsibility in science. Major funding bodies in the UK, Europe and elsewhere are now addressing this issue by insisting on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) in the development of emerging technology. Biotechnologies such as synthetic biology and neurotechnologies have become a particular focus of RRI, partly because of the belief that these are risky technologies involving tinkering with the very building blocks of life, and perhaps even with human nature. With my fellow researchers, I have been involved in trying to develop Responsible Research and Innovation in these technologies for several years.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 50:15
Speaker: : Nikolas Rose