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What is the difference between attention and consciousness? This lecture describes the scientific meaning of consciousness, journeys on the search for neural correlates of visual consciousness, and explores the possibility of consciousness in other beings and even non-biological structures.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:10:01
Speaker: : Christof Koch

This primer on optogenetics primer discusses how to manipulate neuronal populations with light at millisecond resolution and offers possible applications such as curing the blind and "playing the piano" with cortical neurons.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 59:06
Speaker: : Clay Reid

This lecture covers describing and characterizing an input-output relationship.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:35:33

This tutorial talks about how to upload and version your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:36
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to share your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:22
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to run analysis in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:26
Speaker: : Unknown

Inferring results from incomplete data

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 4:28
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Finding parameter values, confidence intervals.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 08:04
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Methods for estimating parameters.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:29
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Measuring the correspondece between data and model.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 3:30
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

How to choose useful variables.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:15
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Common problems in statistical modelling.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:58
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Common problems in statistical modelling.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 3:50
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

You don't have to be a wizard to do statistics!

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 3:18
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

Overview of possible follow up courses and subjects from the same publisher.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:43
Speaker: : Barton Poulson

This talk highlights a set of platform technologies, software, and data collections that close and shorten the feedback cycle in research. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 57:52
Speaker: : Satrajit Ghosh

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl

Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield

In the face of perceived public concerns about technological innovations, leading national and international bodies increasingly argue that there must be ‘dialogue' between policy makers, scientific researchers, civil society organizations and members of the public, to shape the pathways of technology development in a way that meets societal needs and gains public trust. This is not new, of course, and such concerns go back at least to the debates over the development of nuclear technologies and campaigns for social responsibility in science. Major funding bodies in the UK, Europe and elsewhere are now addressing this issue by insisting on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) in the development of emerging technology. Biotechnologies such as synthetic biology and neurotechnologies have become a particular focus of RRI, partly because of the belief that these are risky technologies involving tinkering with the very building blocks of life, and perhaps even with human nature. With my fellow researchers, I have been involved in trying to develop Responsible Research and Innovation in these technologies for several years.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 50:15
Speaker: : Nikolas Rose