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Introduction to the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS): a standard for organizing human neuroimaging datasets. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 56:49

A brief overview of the Python programming language, with an emphasis on tools relevant to data scientists. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:16:36
Speaker: : Tal Yarkoni

Introduction to the types of glial cells, homeostasis (influence of cerebral blood flow and influence on neurons), insulation and protection of axons (myelin sheath; nodes of Ranvier), microglia and reactions of the CNS to injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:32

An overview of some of the essential concepts in neuropharmacology (e.g. receptor binding, agonism, antagonism), an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and an overview of the drug discovery process relative to diseases of the Central Nervous System.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 45:47

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

Introduction to reproducible research. The lecture provides an overview of the core skills and practical solutions required to practice reproducible research. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:25:17
Speaker: : Fernando Perez

This lecture provides guidance on the ethical considerations the clinical neuroimaging community faces when applying the FAIR principles to their research. This lecture was part of the FAIR approaches for neuroimaging research session at the 2020 INCF Assembly.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:11
Speaker: : Gustav Nilsonne
Course:

 

Panel discussion by leading scientists, engineers and philosophers discuss what brain-computer interfaces are and the unique scientific and ethical challenges they pose. hosted by Lynne Malcolm from ABC Radio National's All in the Mind program and features:

  • Dr Hannah Maslen, Deputy Director, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford
  • Prof. Eric Racine, Director, Pragmatic Health Ethics Research Unity, Montreal Institute of Clinical Research
  • Prof Jeffrey Rosenfeld, Director, Monash Institute of Medical Engineering, Monash University
  • Dr Isabell Kiral-Kornek, AI and Life Sciences Researcher, IBM Research
  • A/Prof Adrian Carter, Neuroethics Program Coordinator, ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function

 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:14:34
Course:

 

Panel of experts discuss the virtues and risks of our digital health data being captured and used by others in the age of Facebook, metadata retention laws, Cambridge Analytica and a rapidly evolving neuroscience. The discussion was moderated by Jon Faine, ABC Radio presenter. The panelists were:

  • Mr Sven Bluemmel, Victorian Information Commissioner
  • Prof Judy Illes, Neuroethics Canada, University of British Columbia, Order of Canada
  • Prof Mark Andrejevic, Professor of Media Studies, Monash University
  • Ms Vrinda Edan, Chief Operating Officer, Victorian Mental Illness Awareness Council


 

 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:10:30

As researchers develop new non-invasive direct-to-consumer technologies that read and stimulate the brain, society must consider the appropriate uses of such devices. Will these brain technologies eventually allow enhancement of abilities beyond human capabilities? In what settings are people using these devices outside the purview of researchers or clinicians? Should consumers be allowed to ‘hack’ their own brain in order to improve performance?

To explore these challenges and the ethical issues raised by advances in do-it-yourself (DIY) neurotechnology, the Emerging Issues Task Force of the International Neuroethics Society organized a virtual panel discussion. The panel discussed neurotechnologies such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and electroencephalogram (EEG) headsets and their ability to change the way we understand and alter our brains. Particular attention will be given to the use of neurotechnology by everyday people and the implications this has for regulatory oversight and citizen neuroscience. 

Panelists included:

  • Marcello Ienca, ETH Zurich
  • Karola Kreitmair, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Anna Wexler, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ishan Dasgupta, University of Washington (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:59

Technologies that record and stimulate the brain are set to transform medical treatment, interpersonal life, and even what it means to be human; but these neurotechnologies may, if we’re not careful, continue legacies of harm against people of color, women, LGBTQIA-identifying persons, and disabled people. How can we keep neurotechnology from becoming oppressive? What would 'anti-oppressive' brain technology look like?

Speakers included:

  • Jasmine Kwasa, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Olivia Matshabane, University of Cape Town
  • Francis Shen, University of Minnesota
  • Tim Brown, University of Washington (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:33:16

The INS Emerging Issues Task Force organized a virtual panel discussion on ‘Culturally-Aware Global Neuroethics.’ Panelists explored the issue of cultivating a culturally-aware global neuroethics, and discussed a range of illuminating examples of global priorities in neuroethics. 

Speakers included:

  • Jayashree Dasgupta, Samvedna Senior Care / Sangath
  • Karen Herrera Ferrá, Asociación Mexicana de Neuroética
  • Gulamabbas Lakha, University of Oxford
  • Debra Machando, University of Zimbabwe
  • Rosemary Musesengwa, University of Oxford (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:03:27

The increasing use of neurotechnological devices for basic neuroscience research, clinical applications, but also in the consumer domain, creates substantial ethical and legal challenges for governing the access and use of human brain data collected by these devices. Furthermore, some neurotechnologies, such as AI-based closed-loop brain-computer interfaces, may interfere with a person's mental privacy or mental integrity which has given rise to a debate on the necessity and precise legal framing of neuroprotection laws, also referred to 'neurorights.'

In this interdisciplinary panel discussion, panelists explored and discussed the technical, ethical, and legal dimensions of brain data governance and neurorights.

Speakers include:

  • Samir Das, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University
  • Stephen Rainey, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford
  • Fruszina Molnár-Gábor, Heidelberg Academy of Sciences
  • Philipp Kellmeyer, University Medical Center Freiburg (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:14

The INS Emerging Issues Task Force held a virtual panel discussion on the evolving role and increased adoption of digital applications to deliver mental health care. It was held as a session at the annual conference of the Italian Society for Neuroethics. Speakers were:

  • Nicole Martinez Martin, Stanford University
  • Cynthia Sieck, Ohio State University
  • John Torous, Harvard Medical School
  • Anthony Weiss, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 58:30

21st century environmental challenges coupled to novel scientific understandings of their impacts on neurological and mental health raise a distinct set of considerations at the interface between environmental ethics, brain health, and public policy. How do environmental factors like pollution, toxicity, and radiation affect the brain and present long-term epidemiological concerns? What about the relationship between environmental stressors and mental health among diverse demographic populations? How may public health and environmental strategies work in tandem to design interventions for the built and natural environments? And how can we facilitate discussion of all these questions to promote a future population-level resilience to the challenges brought on by environmental change?

To encapsulate these emerging concerns at the convergence between brain and environmental health whilst aligning it with ethical considerations, the Emerging Issues Task Force of the International Neuroethics Society organized a virtual panel discussion. The panel focused on four areas of analysis. Specific attention was given to how these four tiers come together to provide directions for future ethically-minded and behaviorally-driven environmental health research.

Speakers included:

  • Caleb E. Finch, University of Southern California
  • Laura Y. Cabrera, Pennsylvania State University
  • Louise Harding, University of British Columbia
  • Thomas Albright, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Judy Illes, University of British Columbia (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:03:34