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Félix-Antoine Fortin from Calcul Québec gives an introduction to high-performance computing with the Compute Canada network, first providing an overview of use cases for HPC and then a hand-on tutorial.  Though some examples might seem specific to the Calcul Québec, all computing clusters in the Compute Canada network share the same software modules and environments.

 

The lesson was given in the context of the BrainHack School 2020.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 02:49:34
Speaker: :

The tutorial is intended primarily for beginners, but it will also beneficial to experimentalists who understand electroencephalography and event related techniques, but need additional knowledge in annotation, standardization, long-term storage and publication of data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 35:30

As researchers develop new non-invasive direct-to-consumer technologies that read and stimulate the brain, society must consider the appropriate uses of such devices. Will these brain technologies eventually allow enhancement of abilities beyond human capabilities? In what settings are people using these devices outside the purview of researchers or clinicians? Should consumers be allowed to ‘hack’ their own brain in order to improve performance?

To explore these challenges and the ethical issues raised by advances in do-it-yourself (DIY) neurotechnology, the Emerging Issues Task Force of the International Neuroethics Society organized a virtual panel discussion. The panel discussed neurotechnologies such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and electroencephalogram (EEG) headsets and their ability to change the way we understand and alter our brains. Particular attention will be given to the use of neurotechnology by everyday people and the implications this has for regulatory oversight and citizen neuroscience. 

Panelists included:

  • Marcello Ienca, ETH Zurich
  • Karola Kreitmair, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Anna Wexler, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ishan Dasgupta, University of Washington (moderator)
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:59
Course:

 

Panel discussion by leading scientists, engineers and philosophers discuss what brain-computer interfaces are and the unique scientific and ethical challenges they pose. hosted by Lynne Malcolm from ABC Radio National's All in the Mind program and features:

  • Dr Hannah Maslen, Deputy Director, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford
  • Prof. Eric Racine, Director, Pragmatic Health Ethics Research Unity, Montreal Institute of Clinical Research
  • Prof Jeffrey Rosenfeld, Director, Monash Institute of Medical Engineering, Monash University
  • Dr Isabell Kiral-Kornek, AI and Life Sciences Researcher, IBM Research
  • A/Prof Adrian Carter, Neuroethics Program Coordinator, ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function

 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:14:34

This module covers a brief history of the neurotechnology industry. Join us as we explore the story of neurotech. This lesson brings the history of brain-computer interfacing to life through engaging skits and stories. We cover topics and breakthrough discoveries such as discovering that the brain is the center of consciousness and cognition, the discovery of bioelectricity, the creation of technologies that have allowed us to peer into the brain, important experiments conducted in the 20th century, and the start of commercialization and democratization of these technologies.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 12:53
Speaker: : Colin Fausnaught

This lecture will provide an overview of neuroimaging techniques and their clinical applications

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 41:00
Speaker: : Dafna Ben Bashat

A basic introduction to clinical presentation of schizophrenia, its etiology, and current treatment options.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 51:49

The lecture focuses on rationale for employing neuroimaging methods for movement disorders

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:04:04
Speaker: : Bogdan Draganski

The INS Emerging Issues Task Force held a virtual panel discussion on the evolving role and increased adoption of digital applications to deliver mental health care. It was held as a session at the annual conference of the Italian Society for Neuroethics. Speakers were:

  • Nicole Martinez Martin, Stanford University
  • Cynthia Sieck, Ohio State University
  • John Torous, Harvard Medical School
  • Anthony Weiss, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 58:30

Introduction to the types of glial cells, homeostasis (influence of cerebral blood flow and influence on neurons), insulation and protection of axons (myelin sheath; nodes of Ranvier), microglia and reactions of the CNS to injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:32

An overview of some of the essential concepts in neuropharmacology (e.g. receptor binding, agonism, antagonism), an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and an overview of the drug discovery process relative to diseases of the Central Nervous System.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 45:47

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

Introduction to reproducible research. The lecture provides an overview of the core skills and practical solutions required to practice reproducible research. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:25:17
Speaker: : Fernando Perez

The FOSTER portal has produced a number of guides to help implement Open Science practices in daily workflows, including The Open Science Training Handbook.  It provides many basic definitions, concepts, and principles that are key components of open science, as well as general guidance for developing and implementing these practices in one's own research environments.

 

Topics include:

  • Open Concepts and Principles
  • Open Research Data and Materials
  • Open Research Software and Open Source
  • Reproducible Research and Data Analysis
  • Open Access to Published Research Results
  • Open Licensing and File Formats
  • Collaborative Platforms
  • Open Peer Review, Metrics and Evaluation
  • Open Science Policies
  • Citizen Science
  • Open Educational Resources
  • Open Advocacy
Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: :

This lecture provides guidance on the ethical considerations the clinical neuroimaging community faces when applying the FAIR principles to their research. This lecture was part of the FAIR approaches for neuroimaging research session at the 2020 INCF Assembly.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:11
Speaker: : Gustav Nilsonne