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A brief overview of the Python programming language, with an emphasis on tools relevant to data scientists. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:16:36
Speaker: : Tal Yarkoni

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre
Course:

Colt Steele provides a comprehensive introduction to the command line and 50 popular Linux commands.  This is a long course (nearly 5 hours) but well worth it if you are going to spend a good part of your career working from a terminal, which is likely if you are interested in flexibility, power, and reproducibility in neuroscience research.

 

This lesson is courtesy of freeCodeCamp.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 05:00:16
Speaker: :

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 8:51
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:16
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 13:39
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:34
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 9:10
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

 

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 13:23
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this module, you will work with human EEG data recorded during a steady-state visual evoked potential study (SSVEP, aka flicker). You will learn about spectral analysis, alpha activity, and topographical mapping. The MATLAB code introduces functions, sorting, and correlation analysis.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:36
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

The tutorial is intended primarily for beginners, but it will also beneficial to experimentalists who understand electroencephalography and event related techniques, but need additional knowledge in annotation, standardization, long-term storage and publication of data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 35:30

The course is an introduction to the field of electrophysiology standards, infrastructure, and initiatives. This lecture contains an overview of the Australian Electrophysiology Data Analytics Platform (AEDAPT), how it works, how to scale it, and how it fits into the FAIR ecosystem.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 18:56
Speaker: : Tom Johnstone

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go?

 

This lecture covers FAIR atlases, from their background, their construction, and how they can be created in line with the FAIR principles.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:24
Speaker: : Heidi Kleven

Tutorial on how to simulate brain tumor brains with TVB (reproducing publication: Marinazzo et al. 2020 Neuroimage). This tutorial comprises a didactic video, jupyter notebooks, and full data set for the construction of virtual brains from patients and health controls. Authors: Hannelore Aerts, Michael Schirner, Ben Jeurissen, DIrk Van Roost, Eric Achten, Petra Ritter, Daniele Marinazzo

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 10:01
Speaker: :

As models in neuroscience have become increasingly complex, it has become more difficult to share all aspects of models and model analysis, hindering model accessibility and reproducibility. In this session, we will discuss existing resources for promoting FAIR data and models in computational neuroscience, their impact on the field, and the remaining barriers. This lecture covers how to make modeling workflows FAIR by working through a practical example, dissecting the steps within the workflow, and detailing the tools and resources used at each step.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 15:14