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Explore how to setup an epileptic seizure simulation with the TVB graphical user interface. This lesson will show you how to program the epileptor model in the brain network to simulate a epileptic seizure originating in the hippocampus. It will also show how to upload and view mouse connectivity data, as well as give a short introduction to the python script interface of TVB.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 58:06
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn

Learn how to simulate seizure events and epilepsy in The Virtual Brain. We will look at the paper: On the Nature of Seizure Dynamics which describes a new local model called the Epileptor, and apply this same model in The Virtual Brain. This is part 1 of 2 in a series explaining how to use the Epileptor. In this part, we focus on setting up the parameters.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 4:44
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn

Manipulate the default connectome provided with TVB to see how structural lesions effect brain dynamics. In this hands-on session you will insert lesions into the connectome within the TVB graphical user interface. Afterwards the modified connectome will be used for simulations and the resulting activity will be analysed using functional connectivity.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:22
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn
Course:

The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) provides access to primary experimental trait data, genotypic variation, protocols and analysis tools for mouse genetic studies. Data are contributed by investigators worldwide and represent a broad scope of phenotyping endpoints and disease-related traits in naïve mice and those exposed to drugs, environmental agents or other treatments. MPD ensures rigorous curation of phenotype data and supporting documentation using relevant ontologies and controlled vocabularies. As a repository of curated and integrated data, MPD provides a means to access/re-use baseline data, as well as allows users to identify sensitized backgrounds for making new mouse models with genome editing technologies, analyze trait co-inheritance, benchmark assays in their own laboratories, and many other research applications. MPD’s primary source of funding is NIDA. For this reason, a majority of MPD data is neuro- and behavior-related.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:36
Speaker: : Elissa Chesler
Course:

EyeWire is a game to map the brain. Players are challenged to map branches of a neuron from one side of a cube to the other in a 3D puzzle. Players scroll through the cube and reconstruct neurons with the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed at Seung Lab in Princeton University. EyeWire gameplay advances neuroscience by helping researchers discover how neurons connect to process visual information. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 03:56
Speaker: : EyeWire
Course:

Mozak is a scientific discovery game about neuroscience for citizen scientists and neuroscientists alike. Players to help neuroscientists build models of brain cells and learn more about the brain through their efforts.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 00:43
Speaker: : Mozak

This tutorial talks about how to upload and version your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:36
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to share your data in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:22
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial shows how to run analysis in OpenNeuro.org

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 2:26
Speaker: : Unknown

Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) are ID numbers assigned to help researchers cite key resources (antibodies, model organisms and software projects) in the biomedical literature to improve transparency of research methods.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:01:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre