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FAIR principles and methods currently in development for assessing FAIRness.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: : Michel Dumontier

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:40
Speaker: : Unknown

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:35
Speaker: : Unknown

This tutorial demonstrates how to use the differential search feature of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas to find gene markers for different regions of the brain and to visualize this gene expression in three-dimensional space. Differential search is also available for the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas and the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:31
Speaker: : Unknown
Course:

The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) provides access to primary experimental trait data, genotypic variation, protocols and analysis tools for mouse genetic studies. Data are contributed by investigators worldwide and represent a broad scope of phenotyping endpoints and disease-related traits in naïve mice and those exposed to drugs, environmental agents or other treatments. MPD ensures rigorous curation of phenotype data and supporting documentation using relevant ontologies and controlled vocabularies. As a repository of curated and integrated data, MPD provides a means to access/re-use baseline data, as well as allows users to identify sensitized backgrounds for making new mouse models with genome editing technologies, analyze trait co-inheritance, benchmark assays in their own laboratories, and many other research applications. MPD’s primary source of funding is NIDA. For this reason, a majority of MPD data is neuro- and behavior-related.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 55:36
Speaker: : Elissa Chesler

GeneWeaver is a web application for the integrated cross-species analysis of functional genomics data to find convergent evidence from heterogeneous sources. The application consists of a large database of gene sets curated from multiple public data resources and curated submissions, along with a suite of analysis tools designed to allow flexible, customized workflows through web-based interactive analysis or scripted API driven analysis. Gene sets come from multiple widely studied species and include ontology annotations, brain gene expression atlases, systems genetic study results, gene regulatory information, pathway databases, drug interaction databases and many other sources. Users can retrieve, store, analyze and share gene sets through a graded access system. Analysis tools are based on combinatorics and statistical methods for comparing, contrasting and classifying gene sets based on their members.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 25:53
Speaker: :

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks. The lecture and tutorial were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

This lecture introduces you to the basics of the Amazon Web Services public cloud. It covers the fundamentals of cloud computing and go through both motivation and process involved in moving your research computing to the cloud. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:09:12
Speaker: : Amanda Tan

As models in neuroscience have become increasingly complex, it has become more difficult to share all aspects of models and model analysis, hindering model accessibility and reproducibility. In this session, we will discuss existing resources for promoting FAIR data and models in computational neuroscience, their impact on the field, and the remaining barriers. This lecture covers how FAIR practices affect personalized data models, including workflows, challenges, and how to improve these practices.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:16
Speaker: : Kelly Shen

As a part of NeuroHackademy 2020, Tara Madhyastha (University of Washington), Andrew Crabb (AWS), and Ariel Rokem (University of Washington) give a lecture on Cloud Computing, focusing on Amazon Web Services

 

This video is provided by the University of Washington eScience Institute.

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 01:43:59
Speaker: :

Shawn Brown presents an overview of CBRAIN, a web-based platform that allows neuroscientists to perform computationally intensive data analyses by connecting them to high-performance-computing facilities across Canada and around the world.

 

This talk was given in the context of a Ludmer Centre event in 2019.

 

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 56:07
Speaker: :

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go?

 

This lecture covers FAIR atlases, from their background, their construction, and how they can be created in line with the FAIR principles.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:24
Speaker: : Heidi Kleven

Introductory presentation on how data science can help with scientific reproducibility.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: : Michel Dumontier

As models in neuroscience have become increasingly complex, it has become more difficult to share all aspects of models and model analysis, hindering model accessibility and reproducibility. In this session, we will discuss existing resources for promoting FAIR data and models in computational neuroscience, their impact on the field, and the remaining barriers. This lecture covers how to make modeling workflows FAIR by working through a practical example, dissecting the steps within the workflow, and detailing the tools and resources used at each step.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 15:14

Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) are ID numbers assigned to help researchers cite key resources (antibodies, model organisms and software projects) in the biomedical literature to improve transparency of research methods.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:01:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

Introduction to reproducible research. The lecture provides an overview of the core skills and practical solutions required to practice reproducible research. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:25:17
Speaker: : Fernando Perez

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go? This lecture covers the biomedical researcher's perspective on FAIR data sharing and the importance of finding better ways to manage large datasets.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 10:51
Speaker: : Adam Ferguson

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go? This lecture covers multiple aspects of FAIR neuroscience data: what makes it unique, the challenges to making it FAIR, the importance of overcoming these challenges, and how data governance comes into play.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:56
Speaker: : Damian Eke

Over the last three decades, neuroimaging research has seen large strides in the scale, diversity, and complexity of studies, the open availability of data and methodological resources, the quality of instrumentation and multimodal studies, and the number of researchers and consortia. The awareness of rigor and reproducibility has increased with the advent of funding mandates, and with the work done by national and international brain initiatives. This session will focus on the question of FAIRness in neuroimaging research touching on each of the FAIR elements through brief vignettes of ongoing research and challenges faced by the community to enact these principles. This lecture covers the processes, benefits, and challenges involved in designing, collecting, and sharing FAIR neuroscience datasets.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 11:35