Skip to main content

This lesson contains practical exercises which accompanies the first few lessons of the Neuroscience for Machine Learners (Neuro4ML) course. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 5:58
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This lesson introduces some practical exercises which accompany the Synapses and Networks portion of this Neuroscience for Machine Learners course. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 3:51
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This lesson introduces the practical exercises which accompany the previous lessons on animal and human connectomes in the brain and nervous system. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 4:10
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

In this lesson, you will learn how to train spiking neural networks (SNNs) with a surrogate gradient method. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 11:23
Speaker: : Dan Goodman

This tutorial provides instruction on how to simulate brain tumors with TVB (reproducing publication: Marinazzo et al. 2020 Neuroimage). This tutorial comprises a didactic video, jupyter notebooks, and full data set for the construction of virtual brains from patients and health controls.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 10:01

The tutorial on modelling strokes in TVB includes a didactic video and jupyter notebooks (reproducing publication: Falcon et al. 2016 eNeuro).

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 7:43

Learn how to create a standard extracellular electrophysiology dataset in NWB using Python.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 23:10
Speaker: : Ryan Ly

Learn how to create a standard calcium imaging dataset in NWB using Python.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 31:04
Speaker: : Ryan Ly

In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a standard intracellular electrophysiology dataset in NWB using Python.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 20:23
Speaker: : Pamela Baker

Learn how to create a standard intracellular electrophysiology dataset in NWB.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 20:22
Speaker: : Pamela Baker
Course:

The goal of computational modeling in behavioral and psychological science is using mathematical models to characterize behavioral (or neural) data. Over the past decade, this practice has revolutionized social psychological science (and neuroscience) by allowing researchers to formalize theories as constrained mathematical models and test specific hypotheses to explain unobservable aspects of complex social cognitive processes and behaviors. This course is composed of 4 modules in the format of Jupyter Notebooks. This course comprises lecture-based, discussion-based, and lab-based instruction. At least one-third of class sessions will be hands-on. We will discuss relevant book chapters and journal articles, and work with simulated and real data using the Python programming language (no prior programming experience necessary) as we survey some selected areas of research at the intersection of computational modeling and social behavior. These selected topics will span a broad set of social psychological abilities including (1) learning from and for others, (2) learning about others, and (3) social influence on decision-making and mental states. Rhoads, S. A. & Gan, L. (2022). Computational models of human social behavior and neuroscience - An open educational course and Jupyter Book to advance computational training.  ​​​Journal of Open Source Education5(47), 146. https://doi.org/10.21105/jose.00146

 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration:
Speaker: :
Course:

This book was written with the goal of introducing researchers and students in a variety of research fields to the intersection of data science and neuroimaging. This book reflects our own experience of doing research at the intersection of data science and neuroimaging and it is based on our experience working with students and collaborators who come from a variety of backgrounds and have a variety of reasons for wanting to use data science approaches in their work. The tools and ideas that we chose to write about are all tools and ideas that we have used in some way in our own research. Many of them are tools that we use on a daily basis in our work. This was important to us for a few reasons: the first is that we want to teach people things that we ourselves find useful. Second, it allowed us to write the book with a focus on solving specific analysis tasks. For example, in many of the chapters you will see that we walk you through ideas while implementing them in code, and with data. We believe that this is a good way to learn about data analysis, because it provides a connecting thread from scientific questions through the data and its representation to implementing specific answers to these questions. Finally, we find these ideas compelling and fruitful. That’s why we were drawn to them in the first place. We hope that our enthusiasm about the ideas and tools described in this book will be infectious enough to convince the readers of their value.

 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration:
Speaker: :
Course:

This Jupyter Book is a series of interactive tutorials about quantitative T1 mapping, powered by qMRLab. Most figures are generated with Plot.ly – you can play with them by hovering your mouse over the data, zooming in (click and drag) and out (double click), moving the sliders, and changing the drop-down options. To view the code that was used to generate the figures in this blog post, hover your cursor in the top left corner of the frame that contains the tutorial and click the checkbox “All cells” in the popup that appears.

Jupyter Lab notebooks of these tutorials are also available through MyBinder, and inline code modification inside the Jupyter Book is provided by Thebelab. For both options, you can modify the code, change the figures, and regenerate the html that was used to create the tutorial below. This Jupyter Book also uses a Script of Scripts (SoS) kernel, allowing us to process the data using qMRLab in MATLAB/Octave and plot the figures with Plot.ly using Python, all within the same Jupyter Notebook.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration:
Speaker: :

This lesson provides an introduction to biologically detailed computational modelling of neural dynamics, including neuron membrane potential simulation and F-I curves. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 8:21
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this lesson, users learn how to use MATLAB to build an adaptive exponential integrate and fire (AdEx) neuron model. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:01
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

In this lesson, users learn about the practical differences between MATLAB scripts and functions, as well as how to embed their neuronal simulation into a callable function.  

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 11:20
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

This lesson teaches users how to generate a frequency-current (F-I) curve, which describes the function that relates the net synaptic current (I) flowing into a neuron to its firing rate (F). 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 20:39
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

This lecture introduces neuroscience concepts and methods such as fMRI, visual respones in BOLD data, and the eccentricity of visual receptive fields. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 7:15
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

This tutorial walks users through the creation and visualization of activation flat maps from fMRI datasets. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:15
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen

This tutorial demonstrates to users the conventional preprocessing steps when working with BOLD signal datasets from fMRI. 

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 12:05
Speaker: : Mike X. Cohen