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Over the last three decades, neuroimaging research has seen large strides in the scale, diversity, and complexity of studies, the open availability of data and methodological resources, the quality of instrumentation and multimodal studies, and the number of researchers and consortia. The awareness of rigor and reproducibility has increased with the advent of funding mandates, and with the work done by national and international brain initiatives. This session will focus on the question of FAIRness in neuroimaging research touching on each of the FAIR elements through brief vignettes of ongoing research and challenges faced by the community to enact these principles.

 

This lecture provides guidance on the ethical considerations the clinical neuroimaging community faces when applying the FAIR principles to their research. This lecture was part of the FAIR approaches for neuroimaging research session at the 2020 INCF Assembly.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:11
Speaker: : Gustav Nilsonne

This module covers many of the types of non-invasive neurotech and neuroimaging devices including Electroencephalography (EEG), Electromyography (EMG), Electroneurography (ENG), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNRIs), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and Computed Tomography

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:36
Speaker: : Harrison Canning
Course:

An introduction to data management, manipulation, visualization, and analysis for neuroscience. Students will learn scientific programming in Python, and use this to work with example data from areas such as cognitive-behavioral research, single-cell recording, EEG, and structural and functional MRI. Basic signal processing techniques including filtering are covered. The course includes a Jupyter Notebook and video tutorials.

 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:09:16
Speaker: : Aaron J. Newman

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go?

 

This lecture covers FAIR atlases, from their background, their construction, and how they can be created in line with the FAIR principles.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:24
Speaker: : Heidi Kleven

This lecture provides an overview of depression (epidemiology and course of the disorder), clinical presentation, somatic co-morbidity, and treatment options.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 37:51