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Brief introduction to Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs), persistent and unique identifiers for referencing a research resource. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:30
Speaker: : Anita Bandrowski

Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) are ID numbers assigned to help researchers cite key resources (antibodies, model organisms and software projects) in the biomedical literature to improve transparency of research methods.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:01:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone

The Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) is a standard prescribing a formal way to name and organize MRI data and metadata in a file system that simplifies communication and collaboration between users and enables easier data validation and software development through using consistent paths and naming for data files.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 0:56

Neurodata Without Borders (NWB) is a data standard for neurophysiology that provides neuroscientists with a common standard to share, archive, use, and build common analysis tools for neurophysiology data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:11
Speaker: : Ben Dichter

The Neuroimaging Data Model (NIDM) is a collection of specification documents that define extensions the W3C PROV standard for the domain of human brain mapping. NIDM uses provenance information as means to link components from different stages of the scientific research process from dataset descriptors and computational workflow, to derived data and publication.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 0:53

Neuroscience Information Exchange (NIX) Format data model allows storing fully annotated scientific datasets, i.e. the data together with rich metadata and their relations in a consistent, comprehensive format. Its aim is to achieve standardization by providing a common data structure and APIs for a multitude of data types and use cases, focused on but not limited to neuroscience. In contrast to most other approaches, the NIX approach is to achieve this flexibility with a minimum set of data model elements.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:03
Speaker: : Thomas Wachtler

Computational models provide a framework for integrating data across spatial scales and for exploring hypotheses about the biological mechanisms underlying neuronal and network dynamics. However, as models increase in complexity, additional barriers emerge to the creation, exchange, and re-use of models. Successful projects have created standards for describing complex models in neuroscience and provide open source tools to address these issues. This lecture provides an overview of these projects and make a case for expanded use of resources in support of reproducibility and validation of models against experimental data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:39
Speaker: : Sharon Crook

NWB: An ecosystem for neurophysiology data standardization

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 29:53
Speaker: : Oliver Ruebel

Lecture on functional brain parcellations and a set of tutorials on bootstrap agregation of stable clusters (BASC) for fMRI brain parcellation which were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Pierre Bellec

This lecture covers structured data, databases, federating neuroscience-relevant databases, ontologies. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:30:45
Speaker: : Maryann Martone

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go?

 

This lecture covers FAIR atlases, from their background, their construction, and how they can be created in line with the FAIR principles.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:24
Speaker: : Heidi Kleven

This talk highlights a set of platform technologies, software, and data collections that close and shorten the feedback cycle in research. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 57:52
Speaker: : Satrajit Ghosh

An agent for reproducible neuroimaging

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:00:10
Speaker: : David Kennedy

The Human Connectome Project aims to provide an unparalleled compilation of neural data, an interface to graphically navigate this data and the opportunity to achieve never before realized conclusions about the living human brain.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 59:06
Speaker: : Jennifer Elam

As models in neuroscience have become increasingly complex, it has become more difficult to share all aspects of models and model analysis, hindering model accessibility and reproducibility. In this session, we will discuss existing resources for promoting FAIR data and models in computational neuroscience, their impact on the field, and the remaining barriers

 

This lecture covers how to make modeling workflows FAIR by working through a practical example, dissecting the steps within the workflow, and detailing the tools and resources used at each step.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 15:14
Course:

This session will explore some practical use cases and see whether these affect your repository, your tool, or your research.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:36

Demo of the BRIAN Simulator. BRIAN is a free, open source simulator for spiking neural networks. It is written in the Python programming language and is available on almost all platforms. We believe that a simulator should not only save the time of processors, but also the time of scientists. Brian is therefore designed to be easy to learn and use, highly flexible and easily extensible.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:27:32
Speaker: : Marcel Stimberg

NeuroFedora is a volunteer driven initiative to provide a ready to use Fedora based Free/Open Source Software platform for neuroscience. We believe that similar to Free Software, science should be free for all to use, share, modify, and study. The use of Free Software also aids reproducibility, data sharing, and collaboration in the research community. By making the tools used in the scientific process easier to use, NeuroFedora aims to take a step to enable this ideal. The CompNeuro Fedora Lab was specially to enable computational neuroscience. It includes everything you will need to get your work done—modelling software, analysis tools, general productivity tools—all well integrated with the modern GNOME platform to give you a complete operating system.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:06:08
Speaker: : Ankur Sinha

neurolib is a computational framework for simulating coupled neural mass models written in Python. It helps you to easily load structural brain scan data to construct brain networks where each node is a neural mass representing a single brain area. This network model can be used to simulate whole-brain dynamics. neurolib provides a simulation and optimization framework which allows you to easily implement your own neural mass model, simulate fMRI BOLD activity, analyse the results and fit your model to empirical data.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:06:53
Speaker: : Çağlar Çakan

GeNN (GPU-enhanced Neuronal Networks) framework, which aims to facilitate the use of graphics accelerators for computational models of large-scale neuronal networks to address this challenge. GeNN is an open source library that generates code to accelerate the execution of network simulations on NVIDIA GPUs, through a flexible and extensible interface, which does not require in-depth technical knowledge from the users.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 59:00