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The Virtual Brain is an open-source, multi-scale, multi-modal brain simulation platform. In this lesson, you get introduced to brain simulation in general and to The Virtual brain in particular. Prof. Ritter will present the newest approaches for clinical applications of The Virtual brain - that is, for stroke, epilepsy, brain tumors and Alzheimer’s disease - and show how brain simulation can improve diagnostics, therapy and understanding of neurological disease.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:35:08
Speaker: : Petra Ritter

The concept of neural masses, an application of mean field theory, is introduced as a possible surrogate for electrophysiological signals in brain simulation. The mathematics of neural mass models and their integration to a coupled network are explained. Bifurcation analysis is presented as an important technique in the understanding of non-linear systems and as a fundamental method in the design of brain simulations. Finally, the application of the described mathematics is demonstrated in the exploration of brain stimulation regimes.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:49:24
Speaker: : Andreas Spiegler

The simulation of the virtual epileptic patient is presented as an example of advanced brain simulation as a translational approach to deliver improved results in clinics. The fundamentals of epilepsy are explained. On this basis, the concept of epilepsy simulation is developed. By using an iPython notebook, the detailed process of this approach is explained step by step. In the end, you are able to perform simple epilepsy simulations your own.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:28:53
Speaker: : Julie Courtiol

A brief overview of the Python programming language, with an emphasis on tools relevant to data scientists. This lecture was part of the 2018 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:16:36
Speaker: : Tal Yarkoni

Tutorial on collaborating with Git and GitHub. This tutorial was part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 2:15:50
Speaker: : Elizabeth DuPre

This talk presents state-of-the-art methods for ensuring data privacy with a particular focus on medical data sharing across multiple organizations.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:49

This lecture talks about the usage of knowledge graphs in hospitals an related challenges of semantic interoperability.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 24:32

This lecture on generating TVB ready imaging data by Paul Triebkorn is part of the TVB Node 10 series, a 4 day workshop dedicated to learning about The Virtual Brain, brain imaging, brain simulation, personalised brain models, TVB use cases, etc. TVB is a full brain simulation platform.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 1:40:52
Speaker: : Paul Triebkorn

This module covers many of the types of non-invasive neurotech and neuroimaging devices including Electroencephalography (EEG), Electromyography (EMG), Electroneurography (ENG), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNRIs), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and Computed Tomography

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 13:36
Speaker: : Harrison Canning

This lecture and tutorial focuses on measuring human functional brain networks. The lecture and tutorial were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 50:44
Speaker: : Caterina Gratton

Lecture on functional brain parcellations and a set of tutorials on bootstrap agregation of stable clusters (BASC) for fMRI brain parcellation which were part of the 2019 Neurohackademy, a 2-week hands-on summer institute in neuroimaging and data science held at the University of Washington eScience Institute.

Difficulty level: Advanced
Duration: 50:28
Speaker: : Pierre Bellec

Since their introduction in 2016, the FAIR data principles have gained increasing recognition and adoption in global neuroscience.  FAIR defines a set of high-level principles and practices for making digital objects, including data, software, and workflows, Findable, Accessible,  Interoperable, and Reusable.  But FAIR is not a specification;  it leaves many of the specifics up to individual scientific disciplines to define.  INCF has been leading the way in promoting, defining, and implementing FAIR data practices for neuroscience.  We have been bringing together researchers, infrastructure providers, industry, and publishers through our programs and networks.  In this session, we will hear some perspectives on FAIR neuroscience from some of these stakeholders who have been working to develop and use FAIR tools for neuroscience.  We will engage in a discussion on questions such as:  how is neuroscience doing with respect to FAIR?  What have been the successes?  What is currently very difficult? Where does neuroscience need to go?

 

This lecture covers FAIR atlases, from their background, their construction, and how they can be created in line with the FAIR principles.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 14:24
Speaker: : Heidi Kleven

This lecture provides an introduction to optogenetics, a biological technique to control the activity of neurons or other cell types with light.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 39:34
Speaker: : Adam Packer

This lecture covers visualizing extracellular neurotransmitter dynamics

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 23:20

Introduction to the types of glial cells, homeostasis (influence of cerebral blood flow and influence on neurons), insulation and protection of axons (myelin sheath; nodes of Ranvier), microglia and reactions of the CNS to injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:32

An overview of some of the essential concepts in neuropharmacology (e.g. receptor binding, agonism, antagonism), an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and an overview of the drug discovery process relative to diseases of the Central Nervous System.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 45:47

This lecture covers the ethical implications of the use of pharmaceuticals to enhance brain functions and was part of the Neuro Day Workshop held by the NeuroSchool of Aix Marseille University.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 1:09:29
Speaker: : Eric Racine

This lecture provides an introduction to the study of eye-tracking in humans. 

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 34:05
Speaker: : Ulrich Ettinger

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl