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Lecture title:

FAIR principles and methods currently in development for assessing FAIRness.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration:
Speaker: : Michel Dumontier
Lecture title:

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:40
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

Tutorial describing the basic search and navigation features of the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:35
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

This tutorial demonstrates how to use the differential search feature of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas to find gene markers for different regions of the brain and to visualize this gene expression in three-dimensional space. Differential search is also available for the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas and the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:31
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

Tutorial describing the basic features of the Brain Explorer® 3-D viewer for the mouse brain

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 6:41
Speaker: : Unknown
Lecture title:

The chair of the workshop is giving an introduction and a motivating argument.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 5:36
Speaker: : Maryann Martone
Lecture title:

This lecture highlights the importance of correct annotation and assignment of location, and updated atlas resources to avoid errors in navigation and data interpretation.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:04
Speaker: : Trygve Leergard
Lecture title:

We are at the exciting technological stage where it has become feasible to represent the anatomy of an entire human brain at the cellular level. In this presentation, the speaker explains that neuroanatomy in the XXI Century has become an effort towards the virtualization and standardization of brain tissue.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 25:27
Speaker: : Jacopo Annese
Lecture title:

This lecture covers essential features of digital brain models for neuroinformatics.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 22:26
Speaker: : Douglas Bowden
Lecture title:

This presentation covers the neuroinformatics tools and techniques used and their relationship to neuroanatomy for the Allen atlases of the mouse, developing mouse, and mouse connectional atlas.

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Duration: 23:41
Speaker: : Mike Hawrylycz
Lecture title:

Introduction to neurons, synaptic transmission, and ion channels.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:07
Lecture title:

2nd part of the lecture. Introduction to cell receptors and signalling cascades

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 41:38
Lecture title:

Introduction to the types of glial cells, homeostasis (influence of cerebral blood flow and influence on neurons), insulation and protection of axons (myelin sheath; nodes of Ranvier), microglia and reactions of the CNS to injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 40:32
Lecture title:

Introduction to the origin and differentiation of myelinating cell types, molecular mechanisms defining onset and progression of myelination, demyelination and remyelination after injury.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:52
Lecture title:

This lecture covers: integrating information within a network, modulating and controlling networks, functions and dysfunctions of hippocampal networks, and the integrative network controlling sleep and arousal.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 47:05
Lecture title:

This lecture focuses on the comprehension of nociception and pain sensation. It highlights how the somatosensory system and different molecular partners are involved in nociception and how nociception and pain sensation are studied in rodents and humans and the development of pain therapy.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 28:09
Speaker: : Serena Quarta
Lecture title:

An overview of some of the essential concepts in neuropharmacology (e.g. receptor binding, agonism, antagonism), an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and an overview of the drug discovery process relative to diseases of the Central Nervous System.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 45:47
Lecture title:

Neuroethics has been described as containing at least two components - the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. The first involves neuroscientific theories, research, and neuro-imaging focused on how the brain arrives at moral decisions and actions, which challenge existing descriptive theories of how humans develop moral thinking and make ethical decisions. The second, ethics of neuroscience, involves applying normative theories about what is right, good and fair to ethical questions raised by neuroscientific research and new technologies, such as how to balance the public benefit of “big data” neuroscience while protecting individual privacy and norms of informed consent.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 38:49
Lecture title:

The HBP as an ICT flagship project crucially relies on ICT and will contribute important input into the development of new computing principles and artefacts. Individuals working on the HBP should therefore be aware of the long history of ethical issues discussed in computing. The discourse on ethics and computing can be traced back to Norbert Wiener and the very beginning of digital computing. From the 1970s and 80s it has developed into an active discussion involving academics from various disciplines, professional bodies and industry.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 46:12
Speaker: : Bernd Stahl
Lecture title:

Like any transformative technology, intelligent robotics has the potential for huge benefit, but is not without ethical or societal risk. In this lecture, I will explore two questions. Firstly, the increasingly urgent question of the ethical use of robots: are there particular applications of robots that should be proscribed, in eldercare, or surveillance, or war fighting for example? When intelligent autonomous robots make mistakes, as they inevitably will, who should be held to account? Secondly, I will consider the longer-term question of whether intelligent robots themselves could or should be ethical. Seventy years ago Isaac Asimov created his fictional Three Laws of Robotics. Is there now a realistic prospect that we could build a robot that is Three Laws Safe?

Difficulty level: Beginner
Duration: 31:35
Speaker: : Alan Winfield